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Enterprises leverage disruptive emerging technologies within their operations to improve processes and accelerate digital transformation

Extension remains the most natural jumping-off point for digital transformation (DT) initiatives, as enterprises can experiment with disruptive technologies within familiar business operations, see their value in generating new business insights, and then use those insights to re-imagine processes. TBR’s Digital Transformation Insights Report: Voice of the Customer shows that vendors need to orient toward development of pointed, industry-centric solutions to retain mindshare. This report, authored by Senior Analyst Boz Hristov, shares survey results across a spectrum of DT issues as well as excerpts from extensive, in-depth discussions with clients currently purchasing DT services.

Additional assessments publishing this week from our analyst teams

While trailing 12-month IT services revenue growth decelerated from 4Q18 to 1Q19, according to TBR’s IT Services Vendor Benchmark, year-to-year growth in 1Q19 of 2.6% surpassed that of 1Q18, which was 2.2%. Vendors are investing in niche digital design areas and industry expertise to drive advisory services activities with C-Suite executives. They are also leveraging established footholds and trust with new buyers to pursue managed services around clients’ application and infrastructure estates. Improving profitability provides vendors with flexibility to invest gains in high-growth and high-value technology-enabled solutions. — Elitsa Bakalova, Senior Analyst

In TBR’s 2Q19 Accenture Initial Response we continue to assess if scale and appetite for innovation still define and shape Accenture’s success as it becomes a solutions broker. We will also look into how platforms supporting omnichannel architecture will underpin Accenture’s efforts to capture custom work and reach $47 billion in sales by 2020. — Boz Hristov

In 1Q19 Dell EMC’s Infrastructure Solutions Group faced year-to-year revenue declines across all segments, including storage, servers and networking, due to a combination of seasonality headwinds and go-to-market challenges. As Dell EMC’s cloud revenue is largely tied to hardware sales, these same challenges compromised its cloud top-line performance. An increasingly strategic partnership with VMware coupled with the new Dell Technologies Cloud portfolio will help boost performance in coming quarters. — Cassandra Mooshian, Senior Analyst

TBR’s Hyperconverged and Converged Market Landscape explores the vendor landscape of these two markets, including leaders and laggards, and the existing and emerging disruptors in the space. This report details recent announcements in the space made by key vendors as well as the disruptive dynamics of emerging hardware trends from nontraditional vendors, such as Amazon Web Services (AWS) with its AWS Outposts.— Stephanie Long, Analyst

TBR’s Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research surveys hyperconverged customers to analyze purchasing patterns, spending habits, adoption trends and the evolving drivers behind vendor selection. Key highlights of this report include customer desire to leverage hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) for private cloud environments and the ongoing shift to consumption-based pricing. We also surveyed current HCI customers to determine their likelihood of adopting AWS Outposts, along with where customers will pull funding from to support this new hardware model. — Stephanie Long

SAIC officially began its integration of Engility’s nearly $1.9 billion in revenue and 7,500 employees in 1Q19, aiming to leverage Engility to accelerate its expansion with a more balanced, diversified and lower-risk portfolio and an enhanced competitive stance in markets adjacent to its core Department of Defense and federal civilian sectors, particularly space and intelligence. A new leadership era is also beginning at the top of SAIC’s executive management, as CEO Tony Moraco will retire effective July 31 and will be succeeded by COO Nazzic Keene, who was elected to the CEO post by SAIC’s board of directors in March. Keene has already implemented numerous changes during the CEO transition period as part of the broader initiative she has spearheaded to flatten SAIC’s management pyramid and streamline operations amid the integration of Engility.— John Caucis, John Caucis

TBR’s 1Q19 Booz Allen Hamilton (BAH) report details how the company completed its fiscal 2019 with strong top-line expansion and record revenues, better-than-anticipated earnings, and its largest quarterly dividend increase in years. BAH’s performance throughout its last fiscal year reflects a soundly differentiated market position and multilayered alignment of the company’s technology and advisory portfolio with the primary missions of its federal customers. In May 2015, when BAH launched its Vision 2020 strategy, industry and company observers criticized the plan over concerns BAH would be investing ahead of demand, which had yet to materialize. BAH has sustained a top-line growth CAGR of nearly 6.2% and an average operating margin of 8.5% (both in excess of peer averages for these metrics in TBR’s Public Sector IT Services Benchmark) since Vision 2020 was enacted, affirming the strategic framework was well conceived and has been well executed. — John Caucis

Tune in Wednesday at 1 p.m. EDT to hear Stephanie Long share highlights from TBR’s HCI research including exclusive recent findings from TBR’s Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research. The webinar will highlight how the HCI market has shifted over the last few years and where TBR sees it headed. Additionally, this will be a great opportunity to ask our analysts your questions about the HCI market. Sign up today!

Dell Technologies knew what it was doing all along

Dell Technologies’ strategies

Deliver ‘essential infrastructure’

Dell Technologies’ key strategy is to deliver on what it promises: comprehensive and competitive essential infrastructure, specifically, hardware and systems software for PCs, data centers and cloud vendors. Dell Technologies fills in this spectrum with a mantra of “from edge to the core to the cloud,” where edge includes PCs, gateways and near-the-edge data center hardware. By “core,” Dell refers to on-premises data centers. Dell has been investing in R&D and in breaking down internal silos to compete in its core business, with a successful recent track record. For the last two years, part of this strategy included consumption-based pricing to compete with cloud offerings. Dell Technologies’ main competitors, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and Lenovo, have similar strategies, including flexible pricing.

‘Better together’ with VMware

The company differs from its competitors in its ownership of VMware, a provider of popular software products that provide an abstraction layer between workloads and hardware, allowing flexibility and efficiency. VMware products run on all vendors’ hardware — a necessity for VMware’s continued presence in the market. Dell Technologies seeks to leverage its relationship with VMware to make it easier for customers to benefit from VMware solutions when they buy them on Dell hardware. This “better together” approach is delicate; “better together” implies “worse apart.” One company spokesperson described Dell Technologies’ approach as offering a combined solution to those who prefer Dell hardware or are indifferent and continuing to offer separate solutions for customers who prefer competitors’ hardware.

With or without Dell hardware, VMware’s solutions are very profitable, and contribute approximately one-third of Dell Technologies’ operating profit. Maintaining VMware’s strong position in both core and cloud markets is critical to Dell’s continued success. For this reason, Dell and VMware must ensure that Dell hardware and VMware cannot be too much better together. VMware also plays a role in Dell’s cloud strategy by playing key roles in the company’s multicloud offering, Dell Technologies Cloud, providing a way to work with multiple clouds, both public and on premises. By providing the ability to move workloads between public and on-premises clouds, Dell makes it easier to bring workloads back on premises, where Dell’s margins are stronger and where, the company claims, customer operating costs are often lower.

Dell Technologies World 2019 was, to a large extent, a celebration of the success of a long-term plan. Dell has emerged from a sequence of going private, shedding many businesses, acquiring a huge federation of related business, and then going public as a healthy, growing company. Despite some continuing challenges, Dell Technologies has largely achieved the goals of an ambitious plan to become the dominant provider of “essential infrastructure,” which includes computer hardware, systems software and supporting services “from the edge to the core to the cloud,” including PCs, cloud hardware and data centers.

VMware Cloud on Dell EMC bridges on-premises infrastructure

“They will be in a complex dance to get their respective customer’s compute, storage and networking needs met,” said Ezra Gottheil, principal analyst at Technology Business Research Inc. “I think VMware has the inside track with their abstraction of the cloud over AWS’ because VMware’s abstraction doesn’t lock you into just one cloud provider.”

Commoditization economics and emerging workloads disrupt the data center landscape

Commoditization mitigation strategies require business model shifts and an ever-watchful eye on exascale cloud entrants

Volume or value?

Toward the end of 2018 in the data center market, two distinct vendor strategies emerged: Vendors began either increasing sales volume or selling lower-volume but higher-value solutions. TBR believes that in 1H19, now that vendors have determined their camps, they will begin to craft competitive strategies directly targeting specific peers. For example, Dell EMC has publicly stated its intent to increase its market share in both servers and storage, and we believe the vendor will target key competitors to gain this share. Similarly, Lenovo’s large-scale data center investments imply significant competitive goals.

In February Lenovo unveiled TruScale Infrastructure Services. This directly competes with Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s (HPE) GreenLake and Dell EMC’s Cloud Flex. It also addresses customer demand for private cloud infrastructure that is financed like a public cloud offering. TruScale is available for Lenovo’s entire stack of data center infrastructure solutions. In April Lenovo unveiled a server portfolio refresh, which likely reinforces its TruScale solutions and increases its competitive edge against Dell EMC and HPE.

TBR believes that during the next few months, Dell EMC and HPE will fight back against Lenovo’s marketing tactics to preserve market share. HPE has an advantage in that it is pursuing value-centric data center sales, so it is likely willing to concede less-profitable sales to Lenovo or Dell EMC. Dell EMC’s stated objective to increase market share in servers and storage will increase competition between the company and Lenovo as both aim to scoop up HPE’s lower-margin customers.

ODM participation heats up as commoditization drives provisioning simplicity

Because data center hardware becomes increasingly commoditized as software capabilities become more advanced, we believe data center vendors will increasingly find themselves competing against ODMs, especially for larger deals. Smaller customers will still show a preference for OEMs as they need the additional software and services provided with OEM data center solutions. Lenovo’s manufacturing capabilities give the company an advantage in the hyperscale space, where Lenovo’s past financials illustrated some successes, and enable the vendor to differentiate from its OEM peers.

On the hyperscale front, ODMs are rising to dominance, but OEMs such as Lenovo remain a force to be reckoned with in the space. As cloud becomes an increasingly central piece of IT environments, public cloud providers seek ways to expand their environments as cost-effectively as possible to preserve profits. TBR believes very large enterprises are likely to explore leveraging hyperscale vendors as well for their on-premises environments if it is cost-effective.

Consumption-based pricing models tie to the commoditization march

TBR’s Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research continues to highlight the correlation between private cloud installments and HCI. Most recent findings indicated that 80% of respondents leveraged their HCI purchase for a private or hybrid cloud environment. Since customers are already turning to HCI for cloud, it is a logical next step for vendors to price HCI like a public cloud solution to deepen the competition.

With their channel partners also engaged, Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo are the three main players in the consumption-based pricing space. Their solutions are not limited to just HCI, but HCI is one of the solutions that can be purchased in this manner. The key value proposition of consumption-based pricing for data center vendors is the ability to bundle software and services into hardware consumption-based deals. This is likely to boost the margin on the solutions. Further, it guarantees larger deals, as in many cases, these consumption-based pricing deals lock customers in for a predetermined duration that has early termination penalties.

Key findings from TBR’s 2H18 Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research

  • TBR forecasts the HCI market will reach $15 billion by 2023, representing a significant growth opportunity for data center vendors.
  • Survey incidence data indicate that the majority of potential customers have not yet begun their hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) journey.
  • Emerging solutions, such as Lenovo’s TruScale Infrastructure Services and AWS Outposts have the potential to shake up the HCI market.

Opportunity for successful HCI vendors is great, as the market will rapidly expand through 2023

The HCI market evolves to meet customers’ changing demands. As customers embrace digital transformation, the opportunity in HCI increases, and vendors invest and adapt to become agents of change for customers. TBR estimates the HCI market will increase from $4.6 billion in 2018 to $15 billion by 2023 as customers leverage HCI for a wide array of needs, both traditional and emerging.

A majority of potential customers have not yet purchased HCI, creating opportunities for all HCI vendors to gain customers. Incidence data from TBR’s research show that only 27% of companies surveyed purchased HCI. This demonstrates the massive opportunity that remains for vendors to gain net-new customers in the space. Converged infrastructure (CI) leaders Dell EMC and Cisco have a distinct advantage over other HCI peers, as their CI legacies have afforded them incumbent status with existing CI customers. Despite the incumbent advantage, there is opportunity for any vendor to capitalize on emerging buyer preferences. For example, software is an increasingly central piece of the HCI story, and with 79% of respondents indicating that they would consider consumption-based HCI purchases, strategic marketing and investments can enable any HCI vendor to rise through the ranks.

While Lenovo is not a leading vendor at this time, 30% of respondents indicated they considered Lenovo for their HCI purchase. Lenovo’s restructured portfolio, its recent unveiling of TruScale Infrastructure Services, and the rapid positive changes in its overall data center business are likely to bolster gains for the vendor in HCI as well. Although Dell EMC’s and Cisco’s leadership in the HCI space has been established, the opportunity in HCI remains vast, even for fast followers in the space. Digital transformation only stands to reinforce this trend as HCI becomes more widely adopted.

Customers leverage HCI for private and hybrid cloud installments as security remains a top concern with public cloud adoption

It is clear the private and hybrid cloud value proposition is a benefit HCI buyers are looking to achieve, with 80% of respondents indicating they leverage HCI for private or hybrid cloud installments. A majority of customers (60%) leverage their HCI for database management, and many of these customers indicated their database management use was for mission-critical purposes. This underscores the need to protect critical and sensitive data. TBR’s research showed that buyers are making additional investments in security in conjunction with HCI, particularly network security.

Graph depicting 2H18 security software purchased with hyperconverged

Going forward, the emergence of AWS Outposts in the market will challenge current HCI deployment trends as Amazon Web Services (AWS) messages its Outposts offering as being able to seamlessly integrate with AWS public cloud, addressing a key driver behind HCI adoption for private cloud installments. AWS Outposts are expected to hit the market in 2H19, so it will take some time before the impact of Outposts is known. However, that AWS is making its Outposts offering available as a managed service will improve ease of use, and will likely increase demand, especially among existing AWS customers as the underlying hardware of Outposts will resemble that of AWS’ public cloud environment.

Lenovo unveils TruScale Infrastructure Services, consumption-based data center pricing

In February Lenovo’s Data Center Group (DCG) unveiled TruScale Infrastructure Services. A Hardware as a Service (HaaS) solution with subscription-based pricing, TruScale makes DCG’s entire ThinkSystem and ThinkAgile portfolio available to customers “as a Service” through both Lenovo sales associates and channel partners. For a monthly fee, customers will gain access to data center infrastructure, which can be installed at the customer’s location of choice. Cost will be based on power consumption, as power consumption is a relatively accurate way to measure usage without compromising infrastructure security. The hardware remains Lenovo-owned, -maintained and -supported, and with no minimum usage requirement, customers gain the financial flexibility available through public cloud offerings without the risks associated with taking data off premises. Further, the monthly pricing structure includes installation, deployment, management, maintenance, remote monitoring, system health checks and removal of the hardware once the subscription expires. Pricing details of the solution have not yet been disclosed and are likely to be determined case-by-case. The solution is currently available only in English and priced in USD and Euros.

DCG’s late-to-market status will be advantageous in the consumption-based pricing realm

DCG is a fast-follower in consumption-based pricing, as Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and Dell Technologies have offered consumption-based pricing for over a year. While these offerings have greater market longevity, as they are typically multiyear agreements, customer adoption remains relatively nascent for consumption-based pricing models. These deals are more complex than traditional hardware sales, and therefore require a mindset shift in some ways to promote adoption, just as cloud did initially. DCG’s entrance into the market times well with customer interest, and the vendor’s later arrival to the space will not prove to be a major inhibitor to growth.

The total inclusion of DCG’s channel partners, in addition to its direct sales force, in providing TruScale, is an asset and distinction for the group. Because Lenovo’s services portfolio is not as mature as that of vendors such as Dell EMC, providing channel partners with this opportunity will prove to be a win-win as it enables channel partners to sell attached services while affording Lenovo a more passive revenue stream. Involving the channel has been an initial challenge for some vendors offering consumption-based pricing as the partners need to be incentivized to pursue it over a traditional hardware sale, in which they would get a lump sum payout versus a subscription-like payout. TBR believes that because Lenovo has arrived to market later than peers with its consumption-based pricing offerings, it was able to work out channel partner challenges before going live with the solution.

Dell Technologies and Draper: Helping IT help business

“Focusing on business outcomes” has become a very shopworn phrase for industry pundits. However, nothing crystalizes the power and importance of the concept more than detailed discussions with IT departments of flagship enterprises followed by tours of the business units they support. Seeing both affords insight into how these IT and line-of-business (LOB) entities view their interactions.

Draper shared its transformation story with a coterie of industry analysts at Dell Technologies’ (NYSE: DVMT) request on July 31 at Draper’s main facility in Cambridge, Mass. The company proved refreshing in its candor as well as in its use of business language to talk about IT rather than using IT language to feign knowledge of business outcomes. Staying focused on business objectives is the way forward for IT vendors and enterprise IT employees alike, and Dell Technologies and Draper are speaking the right language.

Digital transformation starts with executive sponsorship, as cultural change must precede technological change

A recent TBR special report examines the fundamental shift in IT consumption in the public sector “from wallet to will.” In general, this discussion contends that the increased consumerization of IT and the move to virtualization, standardization and automation enable more customer-focused interactions between IT and the LOBs they support. Presently, this concept is slowly working its way into the public sector, and it is no shock to TBR that Draper now has to embark on this transformation, given how much of its activity focuses on government-sponsored projects.

Draper CIO Michael Crones provided an overview of Draper’s history and the recent organizational changes. With Moore’s Law economics driving lower entry price points for adjacent use cases, Draper is currently reviewing its archives of curated IP to determine how, with this newer, lower-cost compute infrastructure, the IP can be repurposed for broader commercial use cases.

Capitalizing on this IP inventory initiative, however, requires a major cultural shift in how IT is viewed, managed and deployed. Many firms fail to have executive management signal the importance of change by stressing the need for, and adherence to, shifting operating practices.

HCI vendors capitalize on digital transformation with private cloud adoption

HAMPTON, N.H. — In many ways, digital transformation equates to rising cloud adoption. Enterprises need the increased agility and flexibility that a cloud environment provides but also want the cost structure associated with cloud. However, new regulations on data sovereignty continue to emerge and security concerns are mounting as data becomes an increasingly valuable asset, creating challenges for enterprises seeking cloud environments. Hardware vendors that initially lost business to cloud providers revel in this shift, as clear markets for both public and private cloud enable infrastructure and services vendors to co-exist.

Despite the need for greater control and security of data, enterprises still demand the agility and flexibility afforded by cloud environments and are increasingly demanding opex-based consumption models. Insights from TBR’s recently published 1H18 Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research report further detail these trends and the impact they will likely have on the data center infrastructure and cloud markets.

Many customers purchasing HCI are doing so for cloud environments

More than 90% of hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) customers surveyed in TBR’s 1H18 Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research are leveraging or will leverage HCI for cloud installments: 54% are leveraging HCI for hybrid cloud, 30% are leveraging HCI for private cloud, and 8% are not currently leveraging HCI for cloud but intend to do so in the future. HCI is well-suited for the cloud as it is highly software-enabled, making spinning it into a private cloud relatively seamless compared to traditional infrastructure environments. Further, HCI sales tend to be more supported with services than legacy infrastructure sales, enabling customers to experience a more collaborative sale. Findings from 1H18 Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research indicate 59% of respondents purchased their HCI solution direct from the vendor, while 62% of respondents received or requested additional hardware services, such as firmware and break-fix, with their HCI purchase.

HCI is a lucrative opportunity for vendors as it combines hardware, software and services into a single sale, increasing margins for hardware vendors and enabling vendors to leverage strategic marketing to sell across their entire portfolio stack rather than one-off piecemeal hardware sales. Further, many HCI vendors successfully bundle additional non-HCI sales on top of HCI purchases, as a customer already strongly considering a given vendor’s HCI architecture is likely to consider other solutions in the portfolio. Respondents in the 1H18 Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research indicated they frequently make additional hardware purchases with HCI sales. However, these additional hardware sales were not necessarily associated with the HCI appliance, with customers purchasing additional hardware for their data centers in many cases. This suggests a broad portfolio is paramount to enterprise success as IT shops look to reduce the number of suppliers they manage while seeking hardware components to maintain existing infrastructure requirements of legacy workloads and building out new environments for native cloud workloads. This will prove advantageous for multiline vendors in the space such as Lenovo, Dell EMC and Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) but will challenge niche vendors such as NetApp and Pivot3.

The rise in consumption-based pricing makes HCI more desirable for cloud installments

Of 1H18 Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research respondents, 81% are considering consumption-based pricing models for future HCI purchases. The reasons for considering consumption-based pricing vary, with less than one-third of respondents doing so for the shift to an opex model alone, indicating that purchasing decisions are more complex than simply to shift expense structures. However, customers are still intrigued by these new pricing options.

The more interest increases for consumption-based HCI purchases, the greater challenges public cloud vendors will face from infrastructure vendors. Dell EMC and HPE both have a strong presence in the consumption-based pricing space, and there are other infrastructure vendors playing in this space less vocally. Competing will be a challenge for public cloud providers as infrastructure vendors message increased security and control without cost increases to battle public cloud options.

There will always be a place for both public and private cloud in the data center market

Although competition will continue to heat up between public cloud and private cloud vendors as evolving market dynamics alter messaging, the need for both installments in the digitizing world will remain. However, as economics become more favorable on the private cloud side, partly due to HCI and consumption-based pricing, customers may consider private cloud options for workloads they previously would have considered a public cloud environment.

For additional information about this research or to arrange a one-on-one analyst briefing, please contact Dan Demers at +1 603.929.1166 or [email protected].

ABOUT TBR

Technology Business Research, Inc. is a leading independent technology market research and consulting firm specializing in the business and financial analyses of hardware, software, professional services, and telecom vendors and operators. Serving a global clientele, TBR provides timely and actionable market research and business intelligence in a format that is uniquely tailored to clients’ needs. Our analysts are available to address client-specific issues further or information needs on an inquiry or proprietary consulting basis.

TBR has been empowering corporate decision makers since 1996. For more information please visit www.tbri.com.

1Q18 device revenue results were boosted by market shifts and increasing ASPs in PCs and smartphones compared to a weaker 1Q17

HAMPTON, N.H. (July 13, 2018) — Technology Business Research, Inc.’s (TBR) 1Q18 Devices and Platforms Benchmark finds that there is ongoing revenue opportunity in both the PC and smartphone markets. Total benchmarked revenue increased 15.9% year-to-year to $112 billion despite indications of saturation in the high end of the PC market.

Total PC benchmarked revenue increased 12% year-to-year to $32 billion. Total PC benchmarked gross profit increased 10.4% year-to-year to $5 billion despite increasing component costs. “Despite speculation that the PC market is dead, major device OEMs have been able to successfully navigate the shifting market and generate healthy profits,” said TBR Analyst Dan Callahan. “Renewed appetite for premium PCs in enterprise — and PC OEMs shifting their go-to-market strategies to respond — has been the primary driver.”

Total benchmarked smartphone revenue increased 11% year-to-year to $72 billion. Total smartphone benchmarked gross profit increased 14.8% year-to-year to $23 billion. Smartphone OEMs are combating worldwide saturation by increasing average selling prices (ASPs). Apple’s gamble with a $1,000 smartphone paid off, as customers responded with demand, and Android peers are following suit.

Device as Service (DaaS), an expansion of the former PC as a Service market, is transforming into an offering aimed at supplanting traditional PC financing. The benchmark explores how HP Inc. was the first of the big three PC OEMs to capitalize on the emerging opportunity and has been the first with concrete outbound messaging to partners and customers. This has afforded the company a lead, but it is not cemented. Dell Technologies and Lenovo will use the path HP Inc. paved to introduce DaaS to the market and quickly solidify their own unique solutions. Lenovo and HP Inc. see opportunity beyond the PC in PC as a Service, thus the introduction of DaaS.

The DaaS opportunity remains mostly untapped. Customers and partners are still trying to understand how this service differs from traditional financing and are still kicking the tires on the analytics often attached by OEMs as the main selling point of DaaS.

TBR’s Devices and Platforms Benchmark provides insight on interrelated ecosystems, including device vendors, platform providers, supplier relations, and technology partners across the consumer and commercial spaces. TBR’s vendor-centric analysis speaks to industry trends, while market sizing illustrates opportunity. Our Devices and Platforms research includes PC, tablet and smartphone vendors; platform providers; and technology partners.

For additional information about this research or to arrange a one-on-one analyst briefing, please contact Dan Demers at +1 603.929.1166 or [email protected].

 

 

ABOUT TBR

Technology Business Research, Inc. is a leading independent technology market research and consulting firm specializing in the business and financial analyses of hardware, software, professional services, and telecom vendors and operators. Serving a global clientele, TBR provides timely and actionable market research and business intelligence in a format that is uniquely tailored to clients’ needs. Our analysts are available to address client-specific issues further or information needs on an inquiry or proprietary consulting basis.

TBR has been empowering corporate decision makers since 1996. For more information please visit www.tbri.com.

Key findings from TBR’s upcoming HCI customer research

Hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) is a growing market ripe with opportunity for vendors. TBR forecasts the market will reach $11.7 billion by 2022. Although TBR research indicates that incumbent vendors with a strong presence in the converged infrastructure (CI) market, such as Dell EMC and Cisco, have an advantage in the space, findings also indicate that a growing number of smaller vendors are rising in popularity. Add to that the approximately one-quarter of existing customers who indicated that brand is not a key factor in their decision making, and it becomes clear that the opportunity to take share from existing vendors is high. Further, with nearly three-quarters of respondents indicating they have not yet taken the plunge into the HCI space, there is massive opportunity, through strategic marketing and support, for vendors to encourage new adopters to be their customers.

HCI has a significant place in the cloud market

Eighty-four percent of respondents indicated they are leveraging HCI for either hybrid or private cloud installations. TBR believes this suggests that cloud is not necessarily an inhibitor to HCI adoption, as some vendors may perceive. Further, we believe this signals that consumption-based pricing options, which 81% of respondents indicated they would be interested in considering in the future, will encourage more HCI adoption. Consumption-based pricing enables customers to select HCI for a capex solution as well as for public cloud if they choose, and they can simply compare performance and other features between the two to make purchasing decisions. Vendors can capitalize on this flexibility with strategic marketing.

IT leaders play a crucial role in the HCI decision-making process

HCI remains a strategic purchase, as evidenced by the fact that 74% of respondents indicated IT directors and managers were one of the decision makers. TBR believes that as customers become more familiar with HCI and their HCI vendor, they will be more likely to make repeat purchases and will be less likely to demand direct-from-vendor sales.

To learn more about TBR’s Hyperconverged Platforms Customer Research, contact Stanley Stevens ([email protected]) or your account executive.