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Capgemini aims for growth in digital marketing services

Building regional capabilities through acquisitions to disrupt the APAC market

In TBR’s most recent Digital Transformation: Digital Marketing Services Benchmark, my colleague Boz Hristov examined trends across different regions and wrote, “While regional nuances … compel vendors to build local resources to ensure they can tailor culturally aligned campaigns, the evolving nature of the DMS [digital marketing services] market is also creating country-specific openings. For example, the last three Olympic Games including PyeongChang (South Korea), Tokyo (Japan) and Beijing (China) have been driving investments and opportunities within Southeast Asia.” In covering Capgemini for more than a dozen years, I’ve seen how the company has been able to combine internal capabilities development and highly strategic acquisitions to stay on the leading edge of trends across the IT services space, including digital marketing services. At the same time, acquisitions enable Capgemini to diversify its geographic reach outside its home market of Europe, namely in North America and APAC.

 

Overall, APAC is becoming a region of acquisition focus as Capgemini strives to diversify global revenues and expand work with local clients in the region. APAC is a major global service delivery location, but activities with local clients are limited outside of Australia and New Zealand. Recent acquisitions in APAC that build on Capgemini’s local market reach include those of Empired in Australia, around digital and cloud; Acclimation in Australia, around SAP consulting and systems integration; Multibook’s SAP global services line in Japan; RXP Services in Australia, around digital, data and cloud; and WhiteSky Labs in Australia around MuleSoft consulting.

 

Capgemini’s innovation, design and transformation brand, Capgemini Invent, is rolling out its capabilities across APAC. Capgemini is establishing a new network around frog, the brand experience design consulting arm of Altran. During 2020 frog scaled from about 500 people in the U.S. and Europe to about 2,000 by absorbing Capgemini Invent’s customer experience team and employees from Capgemini’s acquisitions of global design studio Idean, innovation firm Fahrenheit 212, agency June 21 and customer engagement marketing firm LiquidHub. Frog initially had one studio in Shanghai but has expanded in APAC with studios in Singapore; Hong Kong; Sydney and Melbourne, Australia; and India. Frog’s APAC business emphasizes industrial and special design, tied with the new Capgemini Engineering brand experience and design-led transformation.

 

In some ways, this is a natural outcome of making related tuck-in acquisitions: Eventually, Capgemini creates scale to establish a new business unit or service line. Additionally, it is a way of retaining acquired talent by showing that employees will be part of a special group assembled from similar acquisitions.

Tuck-in acquisitions supported digital services establishment in North America, providing use cases and lessons learned

In 2016, 2017 and 2018, Capgemini made several acquisitions in North America to initially build out its digital services capabilities, some of which now reside in frog. Fahrenheit 212, which Capgemini acquired in February 2016, enhanced Capgemini’s business transformation consulting and digital customer experience solutions portfolio. Lyons Consulting Group, which Capgemini acquired in September 2017, strengthened the company’s position in digital commerce, specifically around integrating Salesforce Commerce Cloud solutions. Idean, which Capgemini acquired in February 2017, expanded Capgemini’s digital transformation consulting capabilities and added seven digital design studios worldwide.

 

The acquisition of LiquidHub in February 2018 further expanded Capgemini’s digital services, notably digital consulting capabilities in North America. With LiquidHub, Capgemini gained customer experience capabilities and improved its ability to capture digital opportunities with clients in the U.S. LiquidHub augmented Capgemini’s client base by adding logos, such as Wells Fargo, Chase, Godiva, Subaru, Microsoft and Amgen, and improved Capgemini’s relationships with clients’ CXOs.

APAC will become a larger revenue contributor in the long term

By making acquisitions, expanding its portfolio, keeping up with trends around digital marketing services, and even leaning on its core strengths around engineering services, Capgemini could become more disruptive in the APAC market in the very near term. The vendor’s combined revenue from APAC and LATAM accounted for 7.8% of total revenue in 2021 and increased 26.2% year-to-year as reported in euros, outpacing revenue growth in other regions.

 

TBR’s most recent report on Capgemini was published on March 7 and provides a detailed analysis of the company’s performance and investments in 4Q21 and 2021. Recent deals such as with Volvo Cars to enable digital transformation of the client’s operations in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation by implementing Salesforce solutions such as Sales Cloud, Service Cloud, Marketing Cloud, Experience Cloud and Configure Price Quote software exemplify Capgemini’s activities that are supported through investments in digital and cloud capabilities. APAC provides opportunities for Capgemini and might be even better suited to pave the way to growth now that the company’s home market of Europe might be disrupted by the war in Ukraine. The deal with Volvo Cars provides Capgemini with a good opportunity to expand into the emerging China market, as Volvo is a well-known European brand but is now managed out of China.

Acquiring digital skills enables vendors to build local resources to expand revenues in APAC

Key Insights

IT services vendors are ramping up activities around building local market resource capacity on top of locally sourced global IT services delivery resources that have existed for decades.

Revenue growth leaders are eyeing opportunities to further penetrate the APAC market by leveraging digital design and creative capabilities to drive high-value opportunities.

Hiring local market resources, appointing leadership and pursuing acquisitions will improve vendors’ ability to diversify global revenues during 2022.

Acquiring digital skills enables vendors to build local resources to expand revenues in APAC

Note: TBR is expanding the IT Services Vendor Benchmark with industry-specialized and geographic deep-dive research, which we will alternate every quarter. In this 2Q21 edition of the report, we have added analysis around strategies, key developments and performance in the APAC region for select vendors in the benchmark.

The IT Services Vendor Benchmark details and compares the initiatives of and tracks the revenue and performance of the largest global IT services vendors. The report includes information on market leaders, vendor positioning, the IT services market outlook, key deals, acquisitions, alliances, new services and solutions, and personnel developments.

Opportunities for IT services abounding in a resurgent APAC market

In the most recent edition of the quarterly IT Services Vendor Benchmark, which published Oct. 7, TBR analysts took a deep dive into services vendors’ performance in APAC over the last few quarters, noting trends and anticipating how the market would react to easing pandemic restrictions and new investments in people and capabilities. The following comes from that deep dive; the full content is available from TBR.

IT services vendors see accelerating revenues as pandemic pressures slow and local investments grow

While pandemic-related pressures slowed APAC revenue growth for the vendors in TBR’s IT Services Vendor Benchmark during 2Q20, 3Q20, 4Q20 and 1Q21, regional revenue growth accelerated during 2Q21, supported by the gradual lifting of restrictions due to vaccine rollouts across the region. TBR believes the recent ramp-up of hiring of local market resources, leadership appointments, and acquisitions and partnerships will improve vendors’ ability to serve clients that are based in APAC and global clients that have operations in the region, and diversify global revenues during 2022.

APAC revenue leaders aim to better compete globally through investments outside core Japan market

The two benchmarked leaders in revenue size in APAC — Fujitsu and NTT DATA — remain deeply rooted in the APAC market, even as these vendors continue to invest in new resources and capabilities outside their core market of Japan to better attract and support clients abroad. Attempting to penetrate new geographies can be a double-edged sword for the two vendors, as it can help Fujitsu and NTT DATA compete abroad against more established peers in markets such as the U.S. and Europe, but also opens the door for peers to capture market share in Japan. The two companies have thus far taken somewhat divergent paths, with NTT DATA centering its efforts on augmenting U.S. operations through acquisitions, which is helping it gain traction in the market, while Fujitsu focuses on more internal transformations to grow its services resources and portfolio in new markets to earn client mindshare. 

NTT DATA closed the acquisitions of Acorio in 4Q20, Hashmap in 1Q21 and Nexient in 2Q21. The three U.S.-headquartered companies will add capabilities in digital, cloud and consulting, respectively, and, in the case of Acorio, horizontal technical capabilities around ServiceNow. We fully anticipate North America-focused NTT DATA Services will maintain an active acquisition pace over the next year, as synergies begin to increase and compound, boosting top-line revenue growth into 2022. 

Pursuing APAC expansion through innovation-led engagements around customer experiences

Quickly growing revenue leaders are eyeing opportunities to further penetrate the APAC market by leveraging digital design and creative capabilities to drive high-value opportunities across regions such as Japan and India. Consumer and enterprise preferences toward digital experiences and cloud-based “as a Service” solutions increasingly influences clients’ digital transformation agendas, providing growth opportunities for well-positioned vendors.

Accenture, No. 5 in revenue size in 2Q21, announced the opening of an office in Japan to host Accenture Interactive’s Droga5 team, along with plans to open similar facilities in the next 12 months in Brazil and China. Adding Droga5 capabilities in the country will augment Accenture’s innovation-led discussions to expand the company’s addressable market in areas such as marketing operations, including design, content development and content moderation, among others.

No. 6 in revenue size, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) provided consulting and systems integration services for an India-based over-the-top streaming platform, SonyLIV, to help personalize subscriber experiences leveraging AI and machine learning. As a part of the engagement, TCS will also launch an Experience Design Center focused on rapid prototyping and digital innovation. Engagements such as this can provide a pathway into high-value services with TCS Interactive around digital design, branding and marketing. 

India-based talent serve as launching pad for services in APAC, diversifying revenue streams

The story in India is slightly different. India has traditionally offered an abundance of cost-effective global service delivery, but the local market itself only accounts for a small fraction of most vendors’ total revenues. Some companies are now viewing this juxtaposition as an opportunity, and despite a severe second wave of COVID-19 hitting between April and June 2021, vendors increasingly competed for new business with local clients in India in 2Q21. While India is unlikely to become the next frontier for growth in the near term, demand for digital transformation in the region can be an avenue for global revenue diversification, provided vendors can attract and retain skilled talent amid rising demand.

Earlier this year, Infosys signed a contract with the Federal Bank of India to implement the Oracle Customer Experience Cloud solution, helping the bank improve customer experience. Infosys also developed a new SaaS offering designed specifically for Urban Cooperative Banks in India. Infosys is facing fierce competition in recruiting and sales opportunities from both India-native peers and multinational corporations such as Accenture and Capgemini. For example, during the quarter Accenture signed deals with India-headquartered Mankind Pharma and Bharat Petroleum.

Capgemini’s three awards in the inaugural edition of the NASSCOM Engineering and Innovation Excellence Awards 2021 in India indicate the company is well positioned in the segment. Infosys has an opportunity to double down on its partnerships with Amazon Web Services, Google and Microsoft similar to peers like Wipro and Cognizant, which have formed joint business units and have been investing heavily in the country to provide the infrastructure backbone needed for India to pivot from being a frontier to emerging as a more developed market. Managing messaging around these relationships and Infosys’ broad technology agnosticism might prove most challenging for the company.

The IT Services Vendor Benchmark details and compares the initiatives of and track the revenue and performance of the largest global IT services vendors. The report includes information on market leaders, vendor positioning, the IT services market outlook, key deals, acquisitions, alliances, new services and solutions, and personnel developments.

EY Blockchain Asia: The revolution starts now

EY’s blockchain world

EY’s Asia-Pacific Blockchain Summit started with the firm’s Global Blockchain leader, Paul Brody, making three clear points. First, EY is committed to China and to the region, seeing huge potential for blockchain growth. Second, EY is committed to public blockchain as the long-term solution for most business and governments. Third, Brody’s concept of blockchain as the bridge between enterprises — as the tool to tackle the previously uncrossable chasm between different enterprises’ data and business processes — remains a driving force behind how EY sees the future of blockchain, in Asia and the rest of the world.

TBR’s December 2020 special report EY 2021: Hybrid and omnipresent discussed these latter two points: “Public blockchain, in Brody’s words, ‘will do for networks of enterprises and business ecosystems what ERP did for the single company.’ Brody added that conducting B2B [business-to-business] transactions over a public blockchain increases transparency and compliance with commercial terms.” The February event carried that discussion further, and specifically into Asia. 

EY and public blockchain in China  

Brody outlined a few major developments for EY in China, with all his comments reinforced by the subsequent panel speakers and EY professionals who provided additional color, both for the China-specific elements and developments impacting the entire region. In short:

  • EY has formerly joined the Financial Blockchain Shenzhen Consortium (FISCO) and made the firm’s EY OpsChain solution available on the FISCO BCOS (Be Credible, Open & Secure) platform.
  • EY intends to deploy its entire Ethereum suite of solutions to users in China.
  • EY has fully localized its blockchain entrée — blockchain.ey.com — for the Chinese market.

In addition, Brody touched on the opportunity blockchain presents in Asia, highlighting China and the Chinese market’s emphasis on digital payments as a precursor to blockchain adoption as well as a robust startup scene. He also highlighted three sectors where EY has been “making exceptionally large” investments: financial services, supply chain and the public sector, which underscored one of Brody’s main points around the importance of public blockchain as the core, foundational building block. He noted that “money and stuff are tokens … contracts are a mix of legal agreements and business processes,” so all business could be conducted on the public blockchain, which is EY’s focus on enterprise solutions. 

On Feb. 2, EY hosted an Asia-Pacific Blockchain Summit, a virtual event run by the EY Blockchain practice based in Singapore that included EY professionals and clients, startup executives, and industry experts who are primarily, but not exclusively, based in Asia. The three-hour event included a keynote from EY Global Blockchain Leader Paul Brody, a blockchain solution demonstration, and panel discussions covering the technology, including the challenges and opportunities associated with blockchain and the broader emerging technology space. The following is TBR’s commentary on noteworthy announcements and participants’ assertions made during the event as well as EY’s overall blockchain strategy.

CSPs accelerate 5G deployments to realize the significant cost efficiencies that are inherent in the technology

According to TBR’s 1Q19 5G Telecom Market Landscape, though a viable business case for operators to grow revenue from 5G has yet to materialize (with the exception of fixed wireless broadband), the main driver for operators to deploy 5G is realizing the efficiency gains the technology provides over LTE.

Operators in developed markets worldwide have accelerated their 5G deployment timetables over the past year, primarily because 5G is a significantly more cost-effective solution to handle rising data traffic in their traditional connectivity businesses but also to remain competitive in their respective markets.

TBR estimates over 80% of 5G capex spend through 2020 will be driven by operators in four countries: the U.S., China, Japan and South Korea, with the remaining 20% of spend through 2020 predominantly stemming from Europe and developed countries in the Middle East and APAC that have relatively small populations. Most Tier 1 operators in these countries have aggressive 5G rollout timetables and intend to leverage the technology for fixed wireless broadband and/or to support their mobile broadband densification initiatives. The seamless software upgradability of new RAN platforms to 5G will facilitate deployment at incremental cost, keeping overall spend scaling quickly but at a relatively low level compared to prior RAN generation upgrades.

TBR’s 5G Telecom Market Landscape tracks the 5G-related initiatives of leading operators and vendors worldwide. The report provides a comprehensive overview of the global 5G ecosystem and includes insights pertaining to market development, market sizing, use cases, adoption, regional trends, and operator and vendor positioning and strategies.

People, methodology and trust: PwC’s Tokyo Experience Center

Uncertainty, globalization and trust: How PwC suits the Japanese market

In describing PwC’s presence in Japan, firm leaders said professionals in the consulting practice make up 2,500 of 7,300 total at the PwC Japan firm, with the practice’s revenues growing more than 20% year-to-year.

Echoing sentiments expressed by PwC consulting leaders last month in New York City, the Japan-based team said systems integration (SI) work, currently earning approximately 20% of consulting revenues, would expand in coming years as the BXT model pulls through long-tail SI opportunities. Speaking more broadly about the Japanese market, PwC’s leaders noted that their own research revealed that Japanese companies believe the U.S. and China matter most with respect to overall growth, with the U.S. economy increasingly more important to Japanese companies than China’s economy. In addition, while global executives have cited overregulation, terrorism and geopolitical uncertainty as the top three threats to growth, Japanese executives are worried most about the availability of key skills, especially in digital and emerging technologies. Further rounding out the landscape, PwC’s Japan-based leaders said local companies have expressed a renewed interest in overseas M&A opportunities, in part due to saturation of the Japanese market. PwC leaders added that previous “misconduct” by acquired companies and overseas subsidiaries makes some Japanese companies nervous, causing them to exercise caution and restraint when considering potential acquisitions. Even after folding in cybersecurity issues and overall political and economic risk, plus the costs associated with post-merger integration, the M&A picture appears positive, but quietly so. Within this complete market environment, PwC’s local leaders, including Susumu Adachi, Consulting CEO (Japan); Yukinori Morishita, Group Markets leader; and Nobuaki Otake, Business Transformation lead partner, repeated the message that PwC’s expanding role in Japan revolved around trust—a familiar refrain from previous PwC Experience Center visits and analyst events in Miami, New York, Shanghai, Toronto, and Frankfurt, Germany.

 

On Oct. 3, PwC’s Tokyo Experience Center hosted its first-ever Analyst Day in Japan, marking a significant expansion of the firm’s BXT approach across the globe. Leading the event, Koichiro Kimura, PwC’s Japan group chairman and territory senior partner, outlined the firm’s growth and strategy in Japan as well as initiatives launched by both the Experience Center and the firm’s Data & Analytics (D&A) practice. PwC leaders and Japan-based clients rounded out the event with detailed examples of the firm’s relationships and work across multiple offerings, including cybersecurity, business process reengineering, artificial intelligence and change management.

Signals of consolidation appear in the cloud IoT platform space

Infographic discussing signals of consolidation appearing in the IoT cloud platform space

The cloud IoT platform landscape consolidates around largest vendors as customers seek continuity, consistency and the best tools

Cloud services revenue grew 48.2% year-to-year and increased as a percentage of total benchmarked Internet of Things (IoT) revenue from 12.4% to 15.8% year-to-year in 2Q18. Growth is driven by customers, especially those without deep legacy ties, moving their workloads to the cloud. The public cloud ecosystem is beginning to consolidate, with the top vendors competing on best-in-class tools, partnerships and business-problem-solving messaging.

Software, while still a sizable portion of benchmarked revenue, is experiencing slowing revenue growth, from 19% year-to-year in 2Q17 to 4.2% year-to-year in 2Q18. Software, along with ICT infrastructure, will continue to play a role in IoT solutions with the advent of edge computing, but as providers’ cloud platforms mature and tie-in deals with application partners are cemented, demand increases.

ICT infrastructure revenue grew 14.1% year-to-year in 2Q18 due to increased IoT deployments as well as hybrid IoT becoming an increasingly common IoT framework. ICT infrastructure gross margin rose 80 basis points year-to-year. TBR believes the increase stems from the need for more specialized or powerful hardware to handle the more advanced needs of IoT and its components, such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine vision. Despite the increased utilization of ICT hardware due to hybrid IoT and the need for specialization, the long view for ICT infrastructure will be complicated by commoditization. TBR expects most ICT infrastructure companies to deeply invest in software and service components to buttress the profitability of customer engagements as the threat of commoditization looms.

Vendors across the technology spectrum are all fervently trying to crack the code for the “killer app” within specific verticals that can solve common business problems and be widely adopted by customers. The vendors that win with building the first widely accepted solutions will be set up for success, while others in the oversaturated market will at best become acquisition targets and at worst become history.

For more information, contact Analyst Daniel Callahan at [email protected].

Increased market clarity drives 16.1% year-to-year growth in commercial IoT revenue

Technology Business Research, Inc.’s (TBR) 2Q18 Commercial IoT Benchmark recorded revenue growth of 16.1% year-to-year, to $10.3 billion, in 2Q18, among the 28 IT and operational technology (OT) vendors we benchmark. The revenue growth is largely a result of continued implementation of Internet of Thing (IoT) and growth of installed IoT solutions.

The dousing of rampant IoT hype, which only served to confuse and overwhelm customers and vendors, is helping drive the growth of installed IoT solutions. As the hype dies out, a wave of increased clarity and maturation is forming with vendors rationalizing their go-to-market strategies and messaging, leading to customers better understanding how to apply IoT and vendors learning how to assemble solutions. Packaged solutions are emerging as vendors cooperate, focusing on their strengths, and assemble components sets that solve verticalwide challenges. TBR believes these factors are driving tactical business-focused IoT projects to supersede overambitious projects stuck in proof-of-concept limbo.

However, while easier than in the past, IoT design and implementation are still a challenge. TBR does not expect a huge explosion of revenue beyond midteen growth going forward.

Total 2Q18 commercial IoT benchmarked gross profit increased 16.6% year-to-year to $5.1 billion. Reduced complexity in IoT due to increased knowledge around building and applying IoT as well as the streamlining of portfolios as a result of increased partnering is improving vendor profitability. Also, vendors are leveraging specialized tools, such as artificial intelligence (AI), to justify higher pricing.

 

TBR’s Commercial IoT Benchmark highlights current commercial IoT revenue and gross profit for vendors. TBR leverages financial models and projections across a diverse set of IT and OT components. Additionally, the benchmark outlines the major vendor drivers and trends shaping the market.

The diversity of IoT solutions and their multicomponent and multivendor nature require new approaches from vendors

The Internet of Things (IoT) market is beginning to stabilize, if not mature, and this is a good time for vendors to focus on vertical markets and use cases within those markets, especially where there is a gap that aligns well with an IT vendor’s strength, such as telecom operators’ capabilities in logistics.

“We project total commercial IoT market revenue will increase from $370.3 billion in 2018 to more than $1 trillion in 2023 at a CAGR of 24.4%,” said TBR Analyst Dan Callahan.

Commercial IoT Market Forecast Alternative Market Performance Scenarios 2018-2023

Other topics we cover in the Commercial IoT Market Forecast 2018-2023 Update include the emergence of embedded IoT solutions, the rise of independent software vendors and independent hardware vendors as paths for propagating embedded solutions, and the drivers and inhibitors for select verticals and technology segments where we anticipate the most change.

The Commercial IoT Market Forecast 2018-2023 Update highlights the current and emerging revenue opportunities in the commercial IoT market for vendors. It leverages financial models and projections across a diverse set of IT and operational technology components, verticals and geographies. In addition, the report outlines the major component and industry drivers and trends shaping the market.

For additional information about this research or to arrange a one-on-one analyst briefing, please contact Dan Demers at +1 603.929.1166 or [email protected].

 

ABOUT TBR

Technology Business Research, Inc. is a leading independent technology market research and consulting firm specializing in the business and financial analyses of hardware, software, professional services, and telecom vendors and operators. Serving a global clientele, TBR provides timely and actionable market research and business intelligence in a format that is uniquely tailored to clients’ needs. Our analysts are available to address client-specific issues further or information needs on an inquiry or proprietary consulting basis.

TBR has been empowering corporate decision makers since 1996. For more information please visit www.tbri.com.

1Q18 device revenue results were boosted by market shifts and increasing ASPs in PCs and smartphones compared to a weaker 1Q17

HAMPTON, N.H. (July 13, 2018) — Technology Business Research, Inc.’s (TBR) 1Q18 Devices and Platforms Benchmark finds that there is ongoing revenue opportunity in both the PC and smartphone markets. Total benchmarked revenue increased 15.9% year-to-year to $112 billion despite indications of saturation in the high end of the PC market.

Total PC benchmarked revenue increased 12% year-to-year to $32 billion. Total PC benchmarked gross profit increased 10.4% year-to-year to $5 billion despite increasing component costs. “Despite speculation that the PC market is dead, major device OEMs have been able to successfully navigate the shifting market and generate healthy profits,” said TBR Analyst Dan Callahan. “Renewed appetite for premium PCs in enterprise — and PC OEMs shifting their go-to-market strategies to respond — has been the primary driver.”

Total benchmarked smartphone revenue increased 11% year-to-year to $72 billion. Total smartphone benchmarked gross profit increased 14.8% year-to-year to $23 billion. Smartphone OEMs are combating worldwide saturation by increasing average selling prices (ASPs). Apple’s gamble with a $1,000 smartphone paid off, as customers responded with demand, and Android peers are following suit.

Device as Service (DaaS), an expansion of the former PC as a Service market, is transforming into an offering aimed at supplanting traditional PC financing. The benchmark explores how HP Inc. was the first of the big three PC OEMs to capitalize on the emerging opportunity and has been the first with concrete outbound messaging to partners and customers. This has afforded the company a lead, but it is not cemented. Dell Technologies and Lenovo will use the path HP Inc. paved to introduce DaaS to the market and quickly solidify their own unique solutions. Lenovo and HP Inc. see opportunity beyond the PC in PC as a Service, thus the introduction of DaaS.

The DaaS opportunity remains mostly untapped. Customers and partners are still trying to understand how this service differs from traditional financing and are still kicking the tires on the analytics often attached by OEMs as the main selling point of DaaS.

TBR’s Devices and Platforms Benchmark provides insight on interrelated ecosystems, including device vendors, platform providers, supplier relations, and technology partners across the consumer and commercial spaces. TBR’s vendor-centric analysis speaks to industry trends, while market sizing illustrates opportunity. Our Devices and Platforms research includes PC, tablet and smartphone vendors; platform providers; and technology partners.

For additional information about this research or to arrange a one-on-one analyst briefing, please contact Dan Demers at +1 603.929.1166 or [email protected].

 

 

ABOUT TBR

Technology Business Research, Inc. is a leading independent technology market research and consulting firm specializing in the business and financial analyses of hardware, software, professional services, and telecom vendors and operators. Serving a global clientele, TBR provides timely and actionable market research and business intelligence in a format that is uniquely tailored to clients’ needs. Our analysts are available to address client-specific issues further or information needs on an inquiry or proprietary consulting basis.

TBR has been empowering corporate decision makers since 1996. For more information please visit www.tbri.com.