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TBR Weekly Preview: March 11-15

We’re going all over the technology space this week, with reports spanning U.S. federal government IT services to long-established hardware and data center providers, plus a couple of European-centric companies.

Wednesday:

  • Talent continues to be the constraining factor on ManTech’s bright revenue growth outlook. Focus in defense and intelligence segments of the U.S. federal market on innovation creates healthy demand for ManTech’s labor-based technical services offerings, such as R&D, testing and evaluation of emerging technology. As a smaller competitor compared to many of its large prime peers in the federal sector, ManTech acutely feels the resource impacts of the security clearance backlog and overall tight labor market. TBR’s 4Q18 ManTech report, written by Senior Analyst Joey Cresta, will explore how ManTech uses adaptive learning, continuous monitoring software and new leadership hires to address the human capital challenges associated with scaling up its labor base to meet robust client demand.

Thursday:

  • As detailed in our initial response, Lenovo achieved its sixth consecutive quarter of year-to-year revenue gains, reporting $14 billion in revenue in 4Q18, up 8.5% from the year-ago compare, even as consolidation opportunities cool in the PC market. Despite these high notes for Lenovo exiting 2018, the company will still face hurdles over the next two years. Its PC and Smart Devices businesses will have to deal with challenging and shifting PC environments. Data Center Group continues to deliver on its promises, but it remains in the red despite improvements to its bottom line. Lenovo’s Mobile business is still teetering in profitability. Read our full report by Analyst Dan Callahan to find how Lenovo will navigate these challenges and tee up for a seventh consecutive quarter of revenue growth in 1Q19. 
  • Our detailed assessment of Atos will note that the company’s Digital Transformation Factory portfolio accounted for 30% of revenue in 2018, up from 23% of revenue in 2017, positively affected by increased activities with clients in areas such as orchestrated hybrid cloud, Digital Workplace and cybersecurity. As Senior Analyst Elitsa Bakalova will report, Atos’ efforts to position as a trusted partner for clients’ digital journeys are starting to pay off, and the new digital services strategy will shape the company’s activities over the next three years.
  • As reported in our initial response, Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s (HPE) revenue fell 1.6% year-to-year to $7.6 billion. While revenue growth is always a goal, TBR believes HPE is more focused on improving profitability in the near term before it shifts to boosting revenue growth. In our full report Analyst Stephanie Long will dive into the long-term strategy of CEO Antonio Neri and how it will impact 2019. Key cost-cutting initiatives and strategic investments, such as in high-performance computing and the edge, will be likely highlights in 2019.
  • Analyst Kelly Lesiczka will be reporting that T-Systems’ portfolio and organizational investments continue to improve its ability to gain wallet share in newer areas and stabilize revenue growth in 2018. Building out its emerging technology portfolio offerings, such as for IoT using DT’s product offerings, enables T-Systems to provide more comprehensive and personalized solutions to clients and generate larger-scale engagements to accelerate growth.

As promised, we published a new report last week by Senior Analyst Boz Hristov on Accenture Technology, and today published a report on TELUS International from Boz as well as a report on Mobile World Congress Barcelona 2019 by Principal Analyst Chris Antlitz.

While we do not have a webinar scheduled for this Wednesday, the next one will be on March 20 featuring Senior Analyst John Caucis talking about healthcare IT services.

TBR Weekly Preview: March 4-8

As we start winding down beginning-of-the-year earnings calls, here’s what you can expect from the TBR team this week:

Tuesday:

  • In 3Q18 TBR noted Salesforce built on its industry-specific strategies by releasing Financial Services Cloud for retail banking and by expanding its target audience for Education Cloud. Salesforce’s ongoing innovation to address vertical use cases and ability to understand customers’ business needs enabled the vendor to execute multiproduct deals in 4Q18. TBR expects Salesforce will close 4Q18 with $12.2 billion in annual revenue, keeping the vendor on track to attain its $21 billion to $23 billion annual revenue goal in 2021. (See Jack McElwee for more analysis.)
  • Google Cloud’s hiring of Thomas Kurian as CEO (replacing Diane Greene) is meant to attract enterprise customers and facilitate stronger competition at scale with Amazon Web Services and Microsoft; Kurian, former Oracle president of Product Development, brings deep understanding and detailed messaging on the technical and business impacts of cloud. TBR’s 4Q18 report will detail Google Cloud’s continued innovation among its core AI and ML portfolios while partnering and leveraging Kurian’s clout to gain enterprise mindshare, which will be increasingly critical to long-term success. (For everything Google and cloud, see Cassandra Mooshian.)

Thursday:

  • Cisco continues to grow revenue as it transforms itself through acquisitions, divestments and new product releases that enable the company to reduce its reliance on hardware — a commoditizing market — and embrace software. TBR’s 4Q18 Cisco report will include deep dives on Cisco’s most recent acquisitions, including Luxtera, which will help Cisco attract more webscale spend and improve the performance of its proprietary-based solutions, as well as Ensoft and Singularity Networks, which will broaden Cisco’s software capabilities in the service provider space. (Mike Soper leads TBR’s analysis on Cisco.)
  • TBR will also report on Cisco Services and the company’s expansion around software and next-generation solutions, which has created advisory and implementation opportunities that enabled Cisco Services to accelerate growth in 2018. An increase in software-related services as well as adoption of next-generation secure and intelligent platforms and products that support clients’ digital business will create attached services opportunities for Cisco Services, driving revenue expansion throughout 2019. (For more on Cisco Services, see Kelly Lesiczka.)
  • TBR’s latest report on Perspecta will provide an update on how the fledgling company is managing the task of integrating three legacy organizations into a unified whole. In past reports, we have talked about how the company’s innovation incubator, Perspecta Labs, underpins its long-term position in the federal services landscape. Our 4Q18 Perspecta report will dive more deeply into how the company introduces Perspecta Labs to its biggest client, the U.S. Navy, in advance of the recompete of Perspecta’s largest contract, which entails managing the Navy Next Generation Enterprise Network. (Joey Cresta heads up TBR’s Public Sector practice.)
  • As reported in our initial response, NetApp earned $1.6 billion in revenue in 4Q18, representing a 1.6% year-to-year increase. Strong 1H18 revenue momentum enabled the vendor to achieve solid year-to-year revenue growth for 2018, demonstrating the success of some of NetApp’s strategic moves during the year. Our full report will dive into the 2018 establishment of a cloud infrastructure business unit that will enable NetApp to pivot its portfolio further in 2019, as the company, one of the few major pure play storage vendors left in the market, transforms itself to establish its brand as one that enables customers’ digital transformations. (See Stephanie Long for more analysis.)

Friday:

  • Utilizing its technology expertise and ability to address clients’ business challenges, Capgemini reached its 2018 revenue growth and profitability goals and is confidently moving into 2019. Capgemini’s bookings reached their highest level since 1Q17 in 4Q18. In the latest full report, TBR will note how the increase in bookings, combined with Capgemini’s unified go-to-market approach; enhanced offerings around digital, cloud and industry-specific solutions; and reinforced expertise via training and reskilling, will enable the company to sustain revenue growth. (Elitsa Bakalova covers Capgemini for TBR.)

Be on the lookout for additional analysis from TBR, including assessments of Accenture Technology and TELUS International. TBR’s next webinar will be held March 20 and feature Senior Analyst John Caucis talking about healthcare IT services.

9 floors of innovation, intelligence and industry

Nine floors filled with experts, emerging technologies, partners and clients, all centered on a simple formula: innovation, intelligence and industry, plus rotation to the new while developing new skills.

Counting down to today; investing in tomorrow

A bit of history: Five years ago, Accenture dedicated its Bangalore assets to delivery, focusing on quality, productivity and lowering clients’ (and Accenture’s) costs. Four years ago, the company announced a “rotation to the new,” partially in response to a confusing world of emerging technologies. Three years ago, Accenture’s expectations for the future included everything becoming liquid, intelligent and connected. Last summer, the Bangalore Innovation Hub became an advanced technology center, focused on innovation, intelligence and industry. According to Accenture Technology Group Chief Executive Bhaskar Ghosh, expectations have become reality as Accenture, under one roof, combines those three elements with emerging technologies and a newly skilled workforce. The company invested more than $3 billion in fiscal year 2017 — in training, acquisitions and assets/IP — and will continue to invest this year to build further, cementing its market leader position.

One notable exception to nearly every innovation/experience/collaboration center TBR has visited over the last two years: Accenture has devoted two floors in Bangalore to technology partners, with dedicated professionals and space marked specifically for SAP, Oracle and Microsoft, three partners TBR highlighted in its October 2017 coverage of Accenture: “As Accenture strives to generate a vast majority of its sales from in ‘the new,’ a profitable relationship with the Big Three will be critical to success.” While unmistakably an Accenture facility — no client could be confused about where they are, even when seeing SAP- or Oracle-centric solutions — the investment in resources and physical space to technology partners may be unique across Accenture’s peers. One floor houses just Avanade, the company’s joint venture with Microsoft. TBR has argued for years that consultancies maintaining technology vendor agnosticism should still recognize their clients’ core IT systems will still be there even after the client spends a day being amazed by emerging technologies and all that digital transformation can do. Highlighting, or at least including, these technology partners should be part of any client workshop or design-thinking day. Combined with the “Business Groups” created with SAP, Oracle and, recently Pivotal, Accenture has taken a giant leap forward and literally built separate floors dedicated to these partners.

 

 

On Jan. 24, 2018, TBR attended Accenture Technology’s Analyst Day at the recently opened Innovation Hub in Bangalore, India. The event included technology demonstrations around specific industries and partners, as well as extensive discussions with Accenture executives.